What Is a Painting Contractor?

A painting contractor can work as a sub, or sub-contractor, under a general contractor, or can hire itself out directly to the homeowner. Usually, the painting contractor is a relatively small operation, ranging from the one-man sole proprietor up to 20 or 30 painters working for a small company.

Painting contractors tend to be local (as of yet, there are no nationally franchised paint contractors). While paint contractors concentrate on painting, some perform associated tasks such as plaster repairs, minor drywall work, trim and molding, and wallpapering.

The other difficult part is getting a painting contractor to show up. While this generalization does not apply to every painter, you can rarely get a paint contractor to show up to look at the house and to later produce a written estimate. It’s hardly the fault of the painting contractors; it is a combination of the contractors being smaller operations along with a high demand for their work.

Because it is next to impossible to find out information about local painting contractors on the Internet, the adage “talk to neighbors” applies here. Some painting contractors display signs on the lawns of houses they are working on, but you find this more with general contractors and siding and replacement windows companies. So, other than the painter’s white panel van out front, you often do not know what is going on inside your neighbors’ houses.

 

Urban areas often have local magazines (e.g., in Seattle, there is Seattle Magazine), and many of them feature renovated homes. These pieces will list the names and phone numbers for the contractor and sub-contractors—but be warned, these sub-contractors are usually very high-end and expensive.

 

What Would a Painting Contractor Do?

Most painting contractors will take on any kind of job, from merely painting your window trim to a full-house paint job. But let us assume that they are painting your interior. You can usually expect:

 
  1. Coverage of all areas that will not be painted, such as floors, windows, kitchen counters, and cabinets.
  2. Minor surface preparation before painting, which means light sanding and scraping away loose paint, tapping in a few protruding nails, cleaning off the woodwork, using tackcloth in some areas. The key here is “minor,” as the contractor will assume that the house is mostly in paint-ready condition.
  3. Removal of electrical plates, lights, doors, and other obstacles.
  4. Moving furniture away for better access to the areas to be painted. This is not a painter’s job, so you would need to confirm this beforehand.
  5. Priming new drywall or the current paint with an interior latex primer.
  6. Two coats of the color of interior latex paint on the walls.
  7. Two coats of ceiling paint.
  8. Painting the trim and molding (baseboards, window trim, window muntins, etc.).
  9. Touchups of missed spots.
  10. Cleanups for accidents (no matter how good the coverage with drop-cloths, some drips will happen).
  11. A final evaluation between painting foreman and homeowner.
 

How to Talk to Him

Unlike conversing with an electrician, you do not need to know specialized lingo. Most house painting contractors are good at making things clear to the homeowner.
A few topics you will want to discuss:

 
  • Is the cost of the paint included in the estimate?
  • What type of paint does the contractor intend on using?
  • How many coats will be laid down?
  • How will the non-paintable areas be covered for protection?
  • How long can you the job to take?
  • Is it preferable for the residents to vacate the house during the job?
  • Will masking tape be used around the trim or the cut-in method?
 

How Much Will It Cost?

More than you expect. Some painting contractors will have formulas that they use, totaling up the square footage of walls and ceilings, along with linear footage of trim. They will calculate preparation time, as well as the “hard costs” for primer and paint.

 

Most paint contractors will give you an estimate based on their experience with similar jobs. While this estimate cannot be tied to specifics, it is usually a reasonably good figure. For you, the homeowner, the only way you will know if this is a good estimate is to compare it to quotes you get from other contractors.

 

A whole-house interior paint job like the one described in this article can easily cost around $10,000 or more.

The average cost to hire a painter is $20 to $50 per hour, $200 to $500 per day, or $1 to $6 per square foot. Professional painter’s charge $300 to $800 to paint a 10×12 room. Prices depend on the job size, the season, and the painter’s experience level. Get free estimates from painting contractors near you or view our cost guide below.

meowners are increasingly concerned about how their home’s environment could be negatively affecting their well-being. In fact, a joint 2020 study conducted by Harvard University and the Farnsworth Group reported that 30 percent of all U.S. households “expressed concerns about some aspect of their home posing a risk to their health.” This has led many homeowners to reach out to contractors in the hopes of improving the health of their home through remodeling projects aimed at improving the health quality of their residences.

We took a look at the healthy home projects most commonly completed by contractors in recent years, as well as the advantages and disadvantages for contractors offering them. We compiled these results into an easy-to-read graphic, so you can see the types of projects that homeowners are requesting, and the impacts of those projects on the ones completing them.

This article has been 100% optimized using Squirrly’s Optimization Assistant, which means both Google and human readers…